Janet Carlile: A Faculty Mentor

Posted: March 7th, 2014 | Author: | Filed under: Uncategorized | No Comments »

Microsoft Word - Document3Professor Janet Carlile, a faculty mentor for Olivia Kotz’s area of concentration in “Interdisciplinary Studies of the Human Body,” is a tenured Professor of Art at Brooklyn College, where she has taught since 1971. Her paintings are in numerous collections including the Hirschorn Museum, the Brooklyn Museum, the Museum of Modern Art, the Library of Congress and many others. She is also the director of the Red Mountain Gallery in Ouray, Colorado where her work is displayed. But you don’t have to travel to Colorado to see her beautiful paintings: many of them are available through her website at www.janetcarlile.com


The Importance of Teaching and Sharing

Posted: January 23rd, 2014 | Author: | Filed under: Uncategorized | No Comments »

Toddlers helping and sharing in the playroomChipsNotSharingOn March 1, 2012 the NY Times reported a study that appeared in “Science” (vol. 335, no. 6072, 1114-1118), which highlighted “one of the most important aspects of modern human society: the power of teaching.” Observing the interactions of children in contrast to chimps and monkeys in solving a puzzle box (and being rewarded for success in each of the three stages) it was clear that children cooperated with, motivated and taught each other throughout the process while chimps and monkeys shared neither their rewards nor their knowledge. The researchers concluded: “the most effective means through which you can cooperate is through teaching.” And this cooperative spirit of passing along knowledge explains “why we have particle accelerators and sophisticated medicine,” which are only possible through the cumulative effect of sharing knowledge from one person to the next.


Professor Susan Crile on CUNY TV!

Posted: December 30th, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: Uncategorized | No Comments »

Microsoft Word - Document2Professor Susan Crile, Department of Art and Art History at Hunter College and a CUNY BA faculty mentor, is a noted painter and printmaker, who is featured on CUNY TV’s program, Study with the Best, airing Wednesday, January 1 at 8:00am, 2:00pm, 10:00pm and Saturday, January 4 at 3:30pm. Congratulations!


New Play by a CUNY BA Alumna!

Posted: November 13th, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: Uncategorized | No Comments »

London Postcard - Tree of SeedsKayhan Irani, B.A. 2008 (Theatre and Social Change) and an Emmy award winning writer, is a performer and a senior trainer at the Theater of the Oppressed Laboratory N.Y. — the oldest Theater of the Oppressed training center in the US.

She directs participatory arts projects with government agencies, community based organizations, international NGOs and with the general public. She has led theater for change projects in conflict zones such as Afghanistan and Iraq.

As a recent Fulbright-Nehru Fellow to India, for eight months she undertook research for a new play, entitled “Tree of Seeds,” which is having its first staged reading in London. Congratulations, Kayhan!


Digital Humanities and CUNY BA

Posted: November 8th, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: Uncategorized | No Comments »

MattGoldMatthew K. Gold, Associate Professor of English and Digital Humanities, NYCCT and Graduate Center and Director of the CUNY Academic Commons is our newest CUNY BA faculty mentor.  He is working with CUNY BA student Eileen Clancy on her area of concentration in “Digital Humanities.”

Professor Gold will be speaking at Arizona State University on Thursday, November 21st, at an event that will inaugurate a new Digital Humanities Seed Lab there:

Digital Humanities, Recursive Communities, and the Future of Scholarly Communication

Why do the digital humanities matter, even to those not currently involved in DH? From data-driven explorations of digitized texts to networked pedagogical experiments that connect classrooms across institutions and countries, the digital humanities is fostering new possibilities for academic work. Describing the broad contours of this emerging field and exploring in particular the areas of scholarly publishing and digital pedagogy, this talk builds on Christopher Kelty’s notion of “recursive publics” to argue that academics should play an active role in the creation and sustenance of the digital platforms they use, or soon will be, in their research and teaching.


The Importance of Teaching and Sharing

Posted: November 4th, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: Uncategorized | No Comments »
Image: Chris Gash

Image: Chris Gash

On March 1, 2012 the NY Times reported a study that appeared in “Science” (vol. 335, no. 6072, 1114-1118), which highlighted “one of the most important aspects of modern human society: the power of teaching.” Observing the interactions of children in contrast to chimps and monkeys in solving a puzzle box (and being rewarded for success in each of the three stages) it was clear that children cooperated with, motivated and taught each other throughout the process while chimps and monkeys shared neither their rewards nor their knowledge. The researchers concluded: “the most effective means through which you can cooperate is through teaching.” And this cooperative spirit of passing along knowledge explains “why we have particle accelerators and sophisticated medicine,” which are only possible through the cumulative effect of sharing knowledge from one person to the next.


My Brooklyn: Documentary by a Faculty Mentor

Posted: September 9th, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: Uncategorized | No Comments »

mybrooklynDetails

WHERE: The Graduate Center, 365 Fifth Avenue

ROOM: C200: Proshansky Auditorium

WHEN: September 10, 2013: 6:30 PM

ADMISSION: Free, Reservations Required

RESERVATIONS: 212-817-8215 or

Description

6:30 p.m. screening (85 min), followed by discussion

Kelly Anderson’s acclaimed documentary examines the gentrification of downtown Brooklyn centering on the Fulton Mall. Anderson “strikes a fine balance between personal journal and political exposé” (Variety) as she seeks to understand the forces shaping her borough along race and class lines. Anderson will be interviewed by Mark Jacobson, contributing editor at New York magazine.

My Brooklyn is produced by Allison Lirish Dean, who received a Master’s in Urban Planning from Hunter College.

On Location: New York Films, New York Directors is a film series presenting three filmmakers who not only live in New York but use the city as a subject. Each evening includes a screening and a discussion with the director about the state of independent film production in NYC.

Kelly Anderson‘s My Brooklyn premiered at the 2012 Brooklyn Film Festival, where it won an Audience Award for Documentary. It subsequently had a sold-out run at reRun theater in Brooklyn and has been invited to the Frankfurt Film Festival, the Belfast Film Festival, and This Human World Human Rights Film Festival (Vienna), among other venues. Anderson previously directed Never Enough, a documentary about clutter, collecting, and Americans’ relationships with their stuff. She produced and directed (with Tami Gold) Every Mother’s Son, about mothers whose children have been killed by police officers and who have become national spokespeople. It aired on the PBS series POV and was nominated for Emmy for Directing. Anderson’s other films include SHIFT and Out at Work. Her work has been shown at the Tribeca Film Festival, the Sundance Film Festival, and on HBO. She is an associate professor in the Department of Film and Media Studies at Hunter College.

As a contributing editor for New York, Mark Jacobson has covered everything from 9/11 conspiracy theorists to New York’s top escort to the new Brooklyn. His 2000 feature on drug kingpin Frank Lucas, “The Return of Superfly,” was made into the film American Gangster. That story and others from the past thirty years are collected in the book American Gangster. His 1975 piece “Night-Shifting for the Hip Fleet” became the basis for the TV series Taxi. Jacobson has also been a contributing editor to Rolling Stone, the Village Voice, and Esquire, and is the author of several books, including The Lampshade: A Holocaust Detective Story from Buchenwald to New Orleans; Teenage Hipster in the Modern World; and Everyone and No One.

This program is part of the yearlong initiative Cultural Capital: The Promise and Price of New York’s Creative Economy, produced by GC Public Programs in collaboration with the Advanced Research Collaborative (ARC). For more information and the full schedule, CLICK HERE.

- See more at: http://www.gc.cuny.edu/Public-Programming/Calendar/Detail?id=20734#sthash.TqldEHGt.dpuf


CUNY BA and the Bard Prison Initiative

Posted: August 22nd, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: Uncategorized | No Comments »

PrisonImageCUNY Baccalaureate prides itself in thinking outside the box and providing educational opportunities to as many talented, driven, intelligent individuals as possible. To that end CUNY Baccalaureate has partnered with the Bard Prison Initiative (BPI) that gives incarcerated men and women an opportunity to earn a Bard College degree while serving their sentences.

With an invitation by Jed Tucker, Director of Reentry at the BPI, I had the privilege this summer of visiting Woodbourne Correctional Facility, a medium security prison in Woodbourne, New York, where I spoke to a smart, personable, engaging group of inmates who are serious students in the BPI.

CUNY Baccalaureate for some of these individuals may be their road to re-entry into society after sometimes decades of incarceration. We can say this for certain because Robert Riggs earned through BPI an associates’ degree in 2010 and then completed through CUNY Baccalaureate his bachelor’s degree. He is presently pursuing a Ph.D. in Sociology at New York University.

Robert is simply the tip of the iceberg. The men I met at Woodbourne are equally intelligent and motivated to use their BPI education as a springboard for their future lives on the outside.

The United States with 5% of the world’s population has almost a quarter of the world’s prisoners. One in one-hundred adult Americans is imprisoned and more than 700,000 prisoners are released each year with almost half of them returning to prison within three years!

Today, the U.S. Justice and Education Departments announced new research showing prison education reduces recidivism, saves money, and improves employment. The research shows that prisoners who had educational opportunities while incarcerated had 43% lower odds of returning to prison than those who did not.

Imagine, if there were BPIs at every facility the odds of not returning to prison would be increased by more than 40%, translating into perhaps hundreds of thousands of men and women each year contributing to society rather than being housed and fed by our government in the more than 4,500 prisons across the United States.

CUNY Baccalaureate is pleased to be collaborating with the Bard Prison Initiative and we hope to have its students continue their education at CUNY and earning degrees that will set them on a solid path as proud, productive citizens.


Asia Society Summer Internships: June 28 Deadline!!

Posted: June 21st, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: Uncategorized | No Comments »

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Endowment for Educational Opportunity The
Summer 2013 Internships

About Asia Society

Asia Society is the leading global organization working to strengthen relationships and promote understanding among the people, leaders, and institutions of Asia and the United States. We seek to enhance dialogue, encourage creative expression, and generate new ideas across the fields of policy, business, education, arts, and culture. Asia Society presents a wide range of public programs, including major art exhibitions, performances, films, lectures and international conferences, as well as initiatives to improve elementary and secondary education about Asia.

Founded in 1956, Asia Society is a nonpartisan, nonprofit educational institution with offices in Hong Kong, Houston, Los Angeles, Manila, Mumbai, New York, San Francisco, Seoul, Shanghai, Sydney and Washington, DC.

Purpose of the Endowment

Asia Society’s Endowment for Educational Opportunity provides paid internships for promising undergraduates who might not otherwise be able to devote a summer to work at a non-profit organization. The goal of the Endowment is to give selected students greater knowledge of world affairs as well as practical experience in non-profit and Asia-related careers. The summer internship running over the course of 8 weeks will provide hands-on experience and insight on choices for fields of study and future vocation.

Internship Opportunities

Performing Arts Programs (Code: EEO – PERF ARTS)

The Performing Arts intern will work with Asia Society’s Cultural Programs team on all aspects of program research, development and implementation with a particular focus and performing arts programs. We are extremely interested in finding someone with a background in video editing, as we work towards digitizing our archives this summer.

Responsibilities:

Production assistant on performing arts programs involves working with artists and performers and requires a commitment to working specific evenings and at weekends.

Video editing: Familiarity with Final Cut and knowledge of editing techniques to help cut and digitize video archives.

Outreach: research and contact organizations to build audiences for specific programs.

Promotion: assist in outreach and promotion of programs through web listings, list serves and other media.

Printed materials: assist with the design, production and dissemination of flyers, program notes, press releases and other printed promotional material.

Administrative and logistical support: working closely with fulltime program staff the intern will provide assistance in the implementation and logistics of a public program. This includes working with Asia Society volunteers at public programs in the capacity of an assistant house manager as required.

Strong interest in Performing Arts, background and interest in Asia, and experience in video editing are strongly preferred.

Data Services (Code: EEO – DATA)

The Data Services department seeks an energetic intern to assist the Associate Director in maintaining Asia Society’s global donor database. The Intern will gain hands-on experience with nonprofit fundraising databases and research methods for all three of the donor areas (corporate, foundation and individual). The intern will be mentored by individuals with extensive experience in data management and non-profit fundraising.

Duties include, but not limited to:
• Input and update records with a high level of accuracy and attention to detail.
• Research constituents upon request.
• Assist in updating policy and procedure documentation.
• Maintains data entry requirements by following data entry procedures.
• Work closely with Associate Director to identify duplicate records and merge existing information.
Skills/Qualifications:
Typing, Data Entry Skills, Attention to Detail, Confidentiality, Thoroughness, Independence, Analyzing Information, Results Driven, High Energy Level

If interested, please contact me:  KHartswick@gc.cuny.edu

I can send you the application form and details.


CUNY BA Messenger Bag goes to Nepal!

Posted: June 11th, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: Uncategorized | No Comments »

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When Michael Prettyman, a 2013 graduate, won a CUNY Baccalaureate International Foundation for Study Abroad Scholarship to Nepal in 2011 he climbed, with a Nepalese guide, to the Annapurna Massiff along the border with Tibet. Traveling with him was his CUNY Baccalaureate messenger bag.

Can you top this?  Let us know what sites your messenger bag has seen!